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ACOM to build open-air pavilion and community garden on campus

The Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine (ACOM) Board of Directors recently approved the construction of a new open-air pavilion and the development of several acres into a community garden with fruit- and vegetable-producing plants on the ACOM campus. This addition serves as the campus’s latest expansion that will offer unique opportunities for learning.

This project will create an outdoor space for student and faculty events. The open-air pavilion will feature a covered area with audience seating for up to 224 people and table-and-chair seating for smaller groups. This covered area may also be used informally for outdoor eating and study on a regular basis.

The exterior of the pavilion will be designed to coordinate with the main ACOM facility. Construction is planned to begin in Summer 2022. Simultaneously, a task group will work with landscape designers to plan the garden areas.

The new pavilion and community garden were envisioned and planned with the assistance of many faculty and staff. This project represents ACOM’s continued commitment to its core values through the development of innovative areas for enhanced learning and campus life.

ACOM to build open-air pavilion and community garden on campus2022-05-25T09:14:26-05:00

ACOM Students Appointed to 2022 National and Regional Leadership Positions

ACOM is pleased to share the following medical student appointments to leadership positions with several national and regional associations and groups for 2022.

Melanie Weyers, Class of 2023, has been elected as National Board of Directors Chairperson for the Student Osteopathic Medical Association.

Tiffany Wood, Class of 2023, has been appointed as Student Council President for the American Osteopathic College of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.

Donatine Afful, Class of 2024, has been appointed education subcommittee co-chair for the American Osteopathic College of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.

Jennifer Ra, Class of 2024, has been appointed as Membership/Recruitment Representative for the Medical Student Council with the Association of Academic Physiatrists.

Kyle Cohen, ACOM Simulation Fellow, has been appointed as Southcentral Representative for the Emergency Medical Residents Association Medical Student Council.

Joshua D. Collingwood, Class of 2025, has been named Vice-Chair for the Medical Student Section with the Medical Association of the State of Alabama.

Logan Carlyle, Class of 2023, has been named ACOM Council Representative for the Medical Student Section with the Medical Association of the State of Alabama.

Dominic J. Gigliotti, ACOM Anatomy and OPP Fellow, has been appointed to the Special Commission on Osteopathic Medical Licensure Assessment for the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) as the Council of Osteopathic Student Government Presidents representative.

ACOM commends these students for their leadership achievements.

ACOM Students Appointed to 2022 National and Regional Leadership Positions2022-03-23T10:17:09-05:00

ACOM Announces Class of 2022 Early Match Results

In advance of Match Day on March 18, the Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine (ACOM) is pleased to announce the early residency match results for several students from the Class of 2022.

Match Day is an iconic milestone for a medical student as it signifies the shift to a new phase of medical education – residency, a multi-year program with intensive training in a specific specialty. In their final year of medical school, students apply and interview with residency programs where they may want to train in the future. The students and programs rank each other respectively through the National Residency Match Program that runs a computerized algorithm to determine the match. Those match results are revealed, with much anticipation, on Match Day. Certain programs, such as ophthalmology and the military, complete their match processes separately and announce those results in advance.

ACOM is proud of each of these students for their achievements and looks forward to celebrating the Class of 2022 Match Day later this month.

Ophthalmology Match

Tuba Mirza
Ascension Macomb-Oakland Hospital Program
Ophthalmology
Madison Heights, MI

Military Match

Benjamin Duong
Madigan Army Medical Center
Internal Medicine
Army
Tacoma, WA

Carleigh Fisher
San Antonio Military Medical Center
Pediatrics
Air Force
San Antonio, TX

Rachel Katz
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
Internal Medicine
Navy
Bethesda, MD

Megan Pranger
San Antonio Military Medical Center
Internal Medicine
Air Force
San Antonio, TX

Wendy Richardson
Portsmouth Naval Medicine Center
Pediatrics
Air Force
Portsmouth, VA

ACOM Announces Class of 2022 Early Match Results2022-03-07T13:53:18-06:00

Caroline Clark named ACOM 2021-2022 Student Doctor of the Year

Caroline Clark, Class of 2022, has been named ACOM’s 2021-2022 Student Doctor of the Year (SDOY). Each year, the ACOM Student Government Association requests nominations of students who demonstrate the principles of leadership, community service, dedication and professionalism. Osteopathic colleges across the country select one student from their institutions to compete for the national SDOY award.

Clark considers herself a Southeastern transplant, having moved to Alabama from New York nearly 10 years ago. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in biomedical sciences with a minor in philosophy from Auburn University. Clark first learned about osteopathic medicine during ACOM’s fall open house and was immediately drawn to the idea of treating patients past their routine medical needs.

“The osteopathic approach to whole-body wellness with an emphasis on patient-centered care really stood out to me, and I knew this was the medical education I wanted,” Clark said. “ACOM’s faculty, staff, and overall environment felt welcoming from the moment I arrived. I soon understood the relationships I was building at ACOM among my peers, the faculty, and administration would challenge and encourage me to become the best physician I could be.”

Clark served as SGA President for the Class of 2022 before moving to Decatur, Ala., to complete her clinical training. She says her most rewarding experience has been being part of the care team for several 23- and 24-week-old newborns in the Neonatal ICU.

“Here I found my calling in medicine during the encounters with both patients and their families. Although the NICU can be a heartbreaking place at times, there was nothing more gratifying and inspiring than sending a child home with their family,” she explained.

Clark plans to pursue a pediatrics residency and ultimately, either a fellowship in neonatology or other pediatrics subspecialty. She hopes to return to the east coast when she completes training to be closer to family and friends.

As Student Doctor of the Year, Clark will represent ACOM for the national Council of Osteopathic Student Government President’s SDOY competition this spring.

“I am overcome with gratitude for both my peers who nominated me and the selection committee who awarded me this honor, for it is truly humbling to receive such a title,” Clark said. “ACOM has provided me with academic and leadership opportunities that have molded my professional identity, and for this I will always be deeply thankful. Moving forward, I hope to represent all ACOM stands for with integrity and enthusiasm.”

Caroline Clark named ACOM 2021-2022 Student Doctor of the Year2022-03-03T13:44:12-06:00

ACOM, WCCD and Troy University students collaborate during Interprofessional Simulation

Second-year students from the Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine (ACOM) participated in a day-long, joint Interprofessional Education (IPE) medical simulation session on Friday, February 11, 2022, with students from Wallace Community College Dothan (WCCD) and Troy University Dothan. The event was held in the Health Sciences Simulation Center located inside the Heersink Family Health Science Building on the Wallace Campus in Dothan.

During the session, students from each institution worked together to care for a standardized patient, with the goal of gaining a better understanding of the roles and responsibilities each profession has in patient care.

This session is part of an ongoing series of collaborative events between WCCD nursing students, ACOM medical students, and Troy University Dothan nursing and social work students. The program is designed to underscore the value of team-based healthcare. The students were placed in interprofessional groups to encourage collaborative teamwork and problem-solving. The students participated in breakout sessions for a team-building exercise, followed by a case study segment in which each team member was assigned specific roles.

“Wallace is pleased to host this Interprofessional education simulation,” said Dr. Jacqueline Spivey, WCCD Division Director, Associate Degree Nursing. “This simulation allows different members of the healthcare team to communicate with each other to benefit the patient outcomes as well as the healthcare team members cooperative care. This simulation does benefit the students by preparing them for the world outside of the classroom. We are proud to once again partner with ACOM and Troy. As always, it is such an exciting day to see how the groups interact in such a collegial manner to enhance quality patient care.”

“Interprofessional education is experiential learning at its finest, revealing medical team management through experiencing each medical person’s role in healthcare,” said John T. Giannini Jr., MD, ACOM Associate Professor of Internal Medicine/Director of Simulation.

“The Troy University Dothan Campus students have participated in this event for several years now and truly enjoy the experience,” says Rachel Walker, lecturer, Troy Social Work department. “For many students, it is their first time interacting with multiple disciplines. We appreciate the partnership TROY has with Wallace Community College and Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine and look forward to many more years of continued, mutual support for our students and institutions.”

ACOM, WCCD and Troy University students collaborate during Interprofessional Simulation2022-02-14T10:59:29-06:00

ACOM Hosts 2022 Wiregrass District Science Fair

The Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine (ACOM) held the 2022 Wiregrass District Science Fair on Friday, January 28, at the National Peanut Festival in Dothan. This year’s event showcased approximately 100 elementary, middle and high school projects from Geneva and Houston counties.

The District Science Fair is an important event that gives students the opportunity to showcase what they have learned in their appropriate level math and science courses. Middle and high school students can progress to the Regional and State Fairs. High school State Fair winners can move on to the virtual Regeneron International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) to be held May 8-13, 2022. The event helps elementary school students learn the process of science fairs and gain experience in oral presentations, with the hope of inspiring them to participate throughout middle and high school. ACOM engaged schools and teachers across the region to encourage participation in the District Science Fair. This year, 14 elementary, middle and high schools participated.

ACOM established the Wiregrass District Science Fair in 2015, and to date, it continues to be one of the college’s largest annual community outreach initiatives. An integral part of this initiative is student mentorship. Each year, medical students serve as mentors for school-age children through the project development process, with the goal of encouraging future careers in science and healthcare fields.

A complete list of 2022 fair winners is included below.

4th & 5th Grade Projects

AWARD Place Project Name Student(s) School
4th & 5th Grade Overall Best in Show Best in Show Do Boys or Girls Have Better Reflexes? Om Patel, Amelia Bradford Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Individual – First Place 1st Caffeine Affects Typing Speed Jayceton Herring Mulkey Elementary
Individual – Second Place 2nd Ice Melt Down Gabriella Stewart Heard Elementary
Individual – Third Place 3rd Does Caffeine Affect the Heart Kameron Jackson Kelly Springs Elementary
Individual – Honorable Mention HM Soil Erosion Kyra Tolley Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Individual – Honorable Mention HM Separating Oil and Water with Magnets Jesse Bailey Slocomb Elementary
Individual – Best Oral Presentation Best Oral Presentation Wifi Whys Cooper White Mulkey Elementary
Individual – Best Poster Display Best Poster Display Magnetic Repulsion Kaylani Perry Heard Elementary
Group – First Place 1st Do Boys or Girls Have Better Reflexes? Om Patel, Amelia Bradford Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Group – Second Place 2nd Which Drink Has the Highest pH level? Joshua Senn, Devan Brewer Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Group – Third Place 3rd Washing Apples Conner Gillo, Kennedy Parrish, Collin Vickers Mulkey Elementary
Group – Honorable Mention HM Got Milk? Mi’Angel Russ, Paradise Battle Girard Intermediate
Group – Best Oral Presentation Best Oral Presentation Flying Cars Jaida Fitzpatrick, Emmanuel Ealy, Azaria McKinnon, Anthony Crago Selma Street Elementary
Group – Best Poster Display Best Poster Display The Boujee Bakery Erin Devine, Hunter Ash Slocomb Elementary

6th – 12th Grade Projects

AWARD Place Project Name Student(s) School
Best in Show Best in Show Afterimages Drake Randolph Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Animal, plant, computational, and bioinformation 1st Afterimages Drake Randolph Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Animal, plant, computational, and bioinformation 2nd The Fly Buffet Mary Kate Gowen Dothan Preparatory Academy
Animal, plant, computational, and bioinformation 3rd How does the affect of sulforaphane grow on tadpoles’ hind legs? Devin Flowers Jerry Lee Faine Elementary
Animal, plant, computational, and bioinformation HM Which salinity solution is best for raising Brine Shrimp Maurice Robinson Jerry Lee Faine Elementary
Behavioral and Social Science 1st Does playing VR games help or damage your hand-eye coordination? Elijah Dumas, Tyler Evenhuis Highlands Elementary
Behavioral and Social Science 1st “Social Smarties” Nautica Knight, Erin McKinley, Anna Lee Steltenphol Highlands Elementary
Behavioral and Social Science 2nd Taste My Rainbow Maqwan Fleming Beverlye Intermediate
Behavioral and Social Science 3rd Do Video Games Affect Memory? Noah Parkman, William Smith Highlands Elementary
Cellular, molecular, microbiology 1st Which Disinfectant is Best at Killing Germs? Christian Harrison Highlands Elementary
Cellular, molecular, microbiology 2nd 5 Second Rule Elizabeth Brantley Highlands Elementary
Chemistry 1st SHAMPOO – Store bought or homemade; Which is better for your hair? Drinda Coachman Dothan High School
Chemistry 1st A Gut Feeling Joseph Hathaway Dothan Preparatory Academy
Chemistry 2nd Milk to Plastic Jada Mitchell Carver 9th Grade Academy
Chemistry 2nd How Do Different Liquids Affect Rusty Nails? Adam Arafat, Nolan Wood Highlands Elementary
Chemistry 3rd Elephant Toothpaste Santiago Gigliotti Kelly Springs Elementary
Chemistry HM Geode Eggsperiment Lacey Chapman Highlands Elementary
Earth and environmental science 1st Pollution Evolution Ella Stephens, Rowynn Sullivan Highlands Elementary
Earth and environmental science 2nd “Weed Worker” Alyssa Dalton Highlands Elementary
Earth and environmental science 2nd Egg in a Bottle Experiment Colton Register, Keely Weber Highlands Elementary
Earth and environmental science 3rd Solar Oven Christian McKay Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Energy, Sustainable material and Design 1st Is it Worth the Money? Abigail Baxley, Ella Burgess Highlands Elementary
Energy, Sustainable material and Design 2nd Can you use magnetic fields to power a light bulb? Om Mohan, Syed Taha Dothan Preparatory Academy
Energy, Sustainable material and Design 3rd Does Temperature Affect a Magnet’s Strength? Tyler Smith, Max McCabe, Davis Langford Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Energy, Sustainable material and Design HM How do different rocket fins affect a rocket’s flight? Orion Salvador Highlands Elementary
Engineering Mechanics 1st Battery Brainiacs Logan Burkett, Jacob Champlin, Marshall Craft Highlands Elementary
Engineering Mechanics 1st Rock the Boat Sterling Logsdon Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Engineering Mechanics 2nd Robohand Kaelyn Pettway Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Engineering Mechanics 3rd Parachute Sizes Delroy Williams, Matthew Forsey, Peyton Dulaney Selma Street Elementary
Engineering Mechanics HM Riding on Air Ezekiel Young, Cameron Utterback, Jacob Johnson, K’Mori White-Walker Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Medicine and Health Sciences 1st Electrolyte Challenge Evan Dunn, Ethan Pemberton Highlands Elementary
Medicine and Health Sciences 2nd How do masks affect students’ test grades? Sofia Baldwin, Isabel Farmer Highlands Elementary
Medicine and Health Sciences 3rd Is the 5 Second Food Rule True? Max Mitchell Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Medicine and Health Sciences HM Tooth Enamel Jadyn Hutchins, Kiley Howard Morris Slingluff Elementary
Physics, Astronomy, Mathematics and Materials 1st Does Different Style Grip Affect a Golfer’s Swing? Carter Bright Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Physics, Astronomy, Mathematics and Materials 1st Batter’s Up! Kason Cochrane, Luke Woodham, Rylan Wozniak Highlands Elementary
Physics, Astronomy, Mathematics and Materials 2nd Make the Wind Work for You Barron Cowart, Houston Fetsko, Zeke Slingluff Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
Physics, Astronomy, Mathematics and Materials 2nd Which filtration material leads to the best drinking water? Lyriq Caldwell Jerry Lee Faine Elementary
Physics, Astronomy, Mathematics and Materials HM How Does the Size of the Ball Affect the Distance the Ball Travels? Xander Vasquez Carver School for Mathematics, Science & Technology
ACOM Hosts 2022 Wiregrass District Science Fair2022-02-04T16:55:57-06:00

ACOM celebrates Class of 2025 White Coat Ceremony

The Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine (ACOM) held its virtual White Coat Ceremony, honoring the Class of 2025 on Sunday, November 21, 2021. Stevan A. Walkowski, DO, served as the keynote speaker. Dr. Walkowski, who recently joined ACOM as Associate Dean of Clinical Sciences, encouraged students to reflect on what led them to medicine and welcomed them to the osteopathic profession. The ceremony concluded with the students gathered on campus reciting the Osteopathic Pledge of Commitment.

White Coat Ceremony is an annual celebration that represents a rite of passage for a first-year medical student and an important step in the journey toward becoming an osteopathic physician. The traditional white coat is an outward sign of the medical profession and has been worn by physicians for more than 100 years. Formal presentation of the white coat symbolizes an osteopathic medical student’s entrance into a new academic environment, and the acceptance of the obligations and high standards of compassionate care that are expected. Each year, the ACOM marks the achievements of first-year medical students with the presentation of the white coat by each student’s faculty advisor.

The Class of 2025 is ACOM’s ninth class and represents a diverse group of students from 31 states across the nation.

ACOM celebrates Class of 2025 White Coat Ceremony2021-11-21T15:40:26-06:00

Second-year ACOM Students Win College’s Simulation Competition in Intense Final

The Vicodin Vikings have won the 2021 ACOM Simulation Competition (SIMComp)!

Eight teams (a total of 40 students) competed on Friday and Saturday for a chance to advance to the National SimChallenge.

Teams were presented with an emergent clinical scenario, which required medical knowledge, clinical skills, teamwork, communication, and calm nerves to overcome the challenges. One ACOM team advances to the national competition each year.

The final scenario proved to be very challenging for both teams with a fully immersive experience similar to what students would encounter during the national competition. Teams walked into an empty simulated emergency room and were greeted by sirens from EMS rushing in a patient actor in a trauma suit with an exposed leg fracture. Different than previous encounters during SIMComp, patient vitals were reported directly from the en-route ambulance requiring the team to accurately record the information. The patient presented with trauma in multiple systems, including a neck injury and what was later discovered as a ruptured spleen requiring surgery.

The event judges praised the teams throughout the competition for their use of communication huddles and decision-making that allowed them to tackle advanced patient cases.

The Vicodin Vikings are a team of second-year students led by David Cooper. Teammates included: Bobby Monaco, Case Coordinator; Jacob Gramacy, Scribe; Hannah Gregory, History Taker; Carson Woodward, Physical Exam.

In 2017, a team of second-year ACOM students won the national SimChallenge event and represented the United States at the International SimChallenge in Paris, defeating the French team in the final round to become international champions.

In 2020, the ACOM team won the first National Virtual Patient Simulation Challenge hosted by AMSA and won the national competition again in 2021. ACOM hopes to recapture the national title again this year, with the competition resuming as an in-person experience to take place in Washington, DC in April. This local tournament serves as an important step and a valuable training experience in the journey to Nationals.

Second-year ACOM Students Win College’s Simulation Competition in Intense Final2021-11-20T12:34:26-06:00

Jamie Bell, DO, FAAFP, to give 2021 Virtual Commencement Address

The Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine (ACOM) is pleased announce that Jamie Bell, DO, FAAFP, will serve as the keynote speaker for the Class of 2021 virtual Commencement Ceremony. Dr. Bell is a board-certified family medicine physician and a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians (FAAFP). She is a member of the ACOM Board of Directors and also serves as Secretary/Treasurer.

A native of Birmingham, Ala., Dr. Bell is a graduate of John Carroll Catholic High School.  After high school, she attended Agnes Scott College in Atlanta, where she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree with honors in Spanish Pre-Medicine. Dr. Bell received her Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree from Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine (now Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine) in Pikeville, Ky. While in medical school, she was inducted into the Sigma Sigma Phi National Medical Honor Society. She completed residency at St. Vincent’s East Family Practice in Birmingham. While in residency, she was elected “Resident of the Year” twice by the St. Vincent’s East Hospital’s doctors, nurses and staff. She is currently employed with the Birmingham Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center.

Dr. Bell is a member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Osteopathic Association, Mineral District Medical Society, Birmingham Chapter of Jack and Jill of America, Inc. and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. She is an alumna of the 2018-2019 Leadership Hoover Class, and currently serves on their Board of Directors. Dr. Bell previously served on the Board of Directors for Birmingham AIDS Outreach, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham Minority Health Resource Center Young Professionals Board.

Dr. Bell resides in Hoover, Ala. (a suburb of Birmingham). She enjoys running, traveling, mentoring students (of all ages) interested in medicine, and spending time with loved ones.

Jamie Bell, DO, FAAFP, to give 2021 Virtual Commencement Address2021-05-12T16:59:11-05:00

ACOM SOMA Chapter Achieves National Success

The ACOM Student Osteopathic Medical Association (SOMA) recently achieved success on the national level, with the passage of a resolution and the election of students to national positions. The Dean’s Cabinet is proud of these students and their contribution to the profession.

ACOM SOMA Resolution Passed through the AOA House of Delegates

The Student Osteopathic Medical Association (SOMA) holds a House of Delegates twice a year where SOMA members are able to submit resolutions to be voted upon by delegates from each chapter. These resolutions, if passed, are then adopted as official SOMA policy and are eligible to be submitted to the AOA House of Delegates. ACOM SOMA is proud to announce that resolution S-20-26, SUPPORT THE BOLSTERING OF VETERAN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION RESOURCES THROUGH PROVIDER PAY REFORM was approved both at the Spring SOMA House of Delegates and Fall AOA House of Delegates. This resolution aims to support and advocate for provider pay reform and staff management within the VHA system to efficiently and effectively meet the health needs of the United States veteran population. This resolution was authored by ACOM OMS-III students Benjamin Duong, Rebecca Stoll, E’Joven Reed, Amir Khiabani, Alexis O’Connel, Katherine Beyer, Brandon Newell and Morgan Bivens as well as Nicholas Harriel from NYIT COM at Arkansas State University and Jacqueline Chung from PNWU COM. This is the first time that an ACOM SOMA resolution was submitted and passed by both the SOMA and AOA House of Delegates.

ACOM students elected to National SOMA Board of Trustee Positions

ACOM OMS-II student Melanie Weyers was elected as Region II Trustee and ACOM OMS-III student Amir Khiabani was elected as National SOMA Treasurer. Both Students were elected to serve on the National SOMA Board of Trustees in their respective positions.

As Region II Trustee, Weyers will oversee the largest SOMA region including 15 SOMA chapters from Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. She will support SOMA chapters in Region II by facilitating region-wide events and guiding chapter leaders to improve chapter engagement. Her current plan is to expand Region II involvement with the National SOMA Opioid Overdose Prevention Taskforce and to facilitate Naloxone training events. Weyers is the third consecutive ACOM student to serve as the National SOMA Region II trustee.

As National Treasurer, Khiabani will be a senior National SOMA leader that will be overseeing a large budget for SOMA. This position includes working closely with the AOA as well as the SOMA Convention Director to ensure that funds are appropriated strategically. Khiabani will also have the ability to work on projects with other SOMA leaders and has current plans to further develop needs-based funding for students. Khiabani is the first ACOM student to be elected to be a part of senior National SOMA leadership.

 

ACOM SOMA Chapter Achieves National Success2020-10-30T21:15:48-05:00
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